Montauk Community Notes, June 6

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Lately, I’ve been toiling in preparation to welcome a young couple from Lithuania who will stay in the room over my garage this summer. “The studio,” as in, artist’s studio, is a big room with a separate entrance, but no kitchen. It’s rugged. For the past three summers our son Daniel lived there. What a 20-something-year-old guy thinks is clean is not exactly fit for visitors.

On Sunday, Marius arrived. Migle follows in 10 days. She’s still taking exams. Marius is studious and didn’t care that Dan took the TV. He said he’d rather read books and Migle is the same. So far, so good! Marius is studying law, Migle, medicine. Both love dogs, which is great because Chance loves visitors. Chance well knows escape is possible if the upstairs sliding door is open. He escaped once while I was cleaning. Pretending to call the feral cats I managed to lure him to return.

At Montauk Community Church on Sunday most pews were filled. During worship the baptism of Ava Elizabeth Duryea-Kelly, daughter of Travis Kelly and Amy Duryea-Kelly made it a special occasion. Ava, who is about 15 months old, has golden curls and is active and curious. She looked angelic wearing a white organdy dress and matching sandals. Grandparents Chip and Wendy Duryea were present and also on Sunday celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary.

Reverend Bill Hoffmann and wife Valerie marked their 31st wedding anniversary on May 29.

Best wishes to Edna Neuer who celebrated her 88th birthday last week.

Congratulations as well to Taylor Montemarano. She graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in film, video and interactive media from Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut, on May 19. Taylor’s parents are Veronica Montemarano and Paul Monte of Montauk.

There surely were lots of bicyclists pedaling through Montauk on Saturday for the 2013 Ride to Montauk. According to the event website, upward of 1,000 participants make the journey, some from as far as Manhattan for the full 151-mile route. Every time I glanced outside on Saturday afternoon I saw riders cycling by the office.

The Montauk Chamber of Commerce has announced the annual Montauk Harbor’s Old Timer’s Dinner and will honor the Gosman Family: R. Emmett, John, Robert, Richard, Roberta, William and their aunt, Theresa Harrington, on Friday, June 7, at Gosman’s Restaurant, at 7 p.m. The evening begins with a free, open to the public roundtable discussion at 5 p.m. headed by the Gosman family. Dinner follows. Tickets, $35, include a buffet dinner and glass of wine or beer and are available at the Montauk Chamber of Commerce, 668-2429. Credit cards are accepted or you can pay online at www.montaukchamber.com/events.

For more information, contact Laraine Creegan at (631) 668-2355 or laraine@montaukchamber.com.

The annual Blessing of the Fleet takes place Sunday, June 9, at the harbor at Town Dock, at 5 p.m. Its purpose, to bless the boats as the summer fishing season starts and foremost, to commemorate the lives of fishermen who have died. It’s a powerful ritual brought to this country by Portuguese fishermen asking for protection as they faced rough and treacherous seas. This ritual can be found all along the northeast coast. The Village of Montauk started it about 40 years ago.

Conductor and composer Victoria Bond presents “Wagner for Kids…and Everyone Else! about Wagner’s Ring Cycle” at the Montauk Library on Saturday, June 8, at 7:30 p.m. Library events coordinator Carolyn Balducci describes the program as an introduction to opera for beginners of all ages.

Ms. Bond, who has a house in East Hampton, will explain what Wagner and his operas are all about. She will show selected scenes from Metropolitan Opera productions featuring some of the supernatural characters: Rhinemaidens, giants, a dragon and valkeries. She will also show “What’s Opera, Doc?” a classic Looney Tunes cartoon starring Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. This year, Ms Bond did a series of talks at Guild Hall prior to the Met Opera Live in HD Broadcasts. Having heard her speak about opera, Ms. Balducci guarantees the program will be entertaining and informative.

On Wednesday June 12, at 7:30 p.m., singer-songwriter Robert Bruey accompanied by two other musicians will perform at the library. Mr. Bruey grew up in rural New England. His gritty voice and deft, finger-picking guitar style complement his introspective lyrics. According to Bonnie Grice of WPPB-FM, “Bruey…gets your attention without raising his voice … Just the words, the guitar, and his marvelous melodies. A soulful storyteller…”

“A Night of Classic Italian Food & Film” benefit event for the Montauk Playhouse Community Center Foundation takes place Saturday, June 15, at Solé East Resort. Tickets, $75 per person ($100 after June 8 or at the door), are available online at www.montaukplayhouse.org, by phone at (631) 668-1124 or 668-2105, at Willow gift store in the village of Montauk, and at the door.

I had a great time at the Pub Quiz at Montauk Downs on Friday, May 31. The event was sponsored by the Ladies Auxiliary of the Montauk Friends of Erin. I went with MaryAnn Peluso, my co-worker at Atlantic Beach Realty. Too bad my husband was at work, as Don has been known as “Mr. Encyclopedia.” MaryAnn was happy to invite new Montauk homeowners Lissa and Ken Zegar to round out our team. We didn’t do badly, finishing in fourth place. At the next table, neighbors, team 13, came in first.

By chance I had fun speaking with Lou Corradi of the champion team on Saturday when he dropped in to Atlantic Beach Realty. He gave me permission to say he’s a bit of a pro in these competitive quiz events, and, in fact, his team was number one last year, too. Even more interesting, in 2005 he was a contestant on the TV show, “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire,” where he won $50,000, enough to buy a nice car, he said. Other members of his winning team on Friday night were Jessica James, who has been a guest columnist here, “a niece, Maura,” who just finished college in England, and Dennis Sweeny.

I asked Mr. Corradi what question, of the few he missed, he most regretted. He replied, “Which fruit gets bounced in order to test for ripeness?” He and I both answered that question incorrectly. The right answer is, cranberries. I was happy to learn Mr. Corradi and I gave the same wrong answer: “Coconuts.”

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