Army Corps Of Engineers To Present Montauk Beach Nourishment Plans September 26

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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is slated to present plans to the East Hampton Town Board on Thursday morning on how to rebuild the ocean beaches near downtown Montauk, a fully funded federal project that started out as part of a broader, Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, or FIMPS, but that has gotten fast-tracked post-Superstorm Sandy.

The special meeting is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. in Town Hall and will not include public participation. The board does not expect to take action then, according to Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson.

Congress approved earlier this year $700 million in funding for the rebuilding of beaches and other protections for communities along the entire south shore of Long Island, but the Montauk portion of that beach nourishment project has been flagged as a priority after the wallop the hamlet’s downtown took from Sandy. About $500 million of that will be spent for people raising homes on and around Fire Island, said Oliver Longwell, a communications director for U.S. Representative Tim Bishop, a Democrat from Southampton who, along with Mr. Wilkinson, a hamlet resident, pushed for the acceleration of the Montauk project.

The cost of the Montauk portion will depend on the precise work to be done—how much sand is needed and what kind of structures will be recommended to engineer the beach, for example, he said, but it, too, will be 100-percent covered by federal funds.

The Army Corps on Thursday is expected to lay out a variety of suggestions for the best way to move forward on the emergency beach stabilization project for Montauk’s downtown, Mr. Longwell said.

“The ultimate goal is to have a stable beach that protects the vital commercial infrastructure in downtown Montauk and reverses the dramatic erosion effect that we saw as a result of Superstorm Sandy and other storms afterward,” he said.

The Army Corps is shooting to begin work in early 2014, he added.

Mr. Wilkinson said that images he has received indicate that the proposed structures will not be a traditional bulkhead, but, rather, a buried seawall made of rock and covered by several yards of sand.

“So it’s not even perceptible,” he said,” sort of like an underlying foundation.”

FIMPS, which Mr. Longwell said has been in development for 40 years, is a plan to to better protect the south shore of Long Island from the effects of storms.

When the project was initially presented in 2011, it contained a mention of a possible small-scale sand replenishment project in Montauk, but that work had been a low priority for the federal engineers working on the project.

Post-Sandy, Mr. Bishop and Mr. Wilkinson put pressure on the Army Corps and other federal officials to revisit the issue and placed additional emphasis on the importance of rebuilding the beaches that separate the ocean from the hamlet’s business district.

Just prior to the Fourth of July this year, the town conducted a smaller-scale beach nourishment effort to address some of the lingering effects from Sandy, Mr. Wilkinson said. That project involved trucking in and spreading more than 10,000 tons of sand at Ditch Plains, the popular swimming and surfing spot.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could use structures—including one long oceanfront seawall and a series of groins—to rebuild the ocean beaches near downtown Montauk in order to strengthen the shoreline’s resistance to storm flooding.

The Army Corps is slated to present various plans to the East Hampton Town Board on Thursday morning. The proposals are expected to show how the proposed hard structures can be used to shore up the stretch of sand between the Atlantic and the commercial business district, which has been battered by storms and made especially vulnerable to erosion and flooding.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson said that images he has received indicate that one structure would not be a traditional bulkhead, but, rather, a buried seawall made of rock and covered by several yards of sand.

“So it’s not even perceptible,” he said. “Sort of like an underlying foundation.”

Oliver Longwell, communications director for U.S. Representative Tim Bishop, said the Army Corps is expected to lay out a variety of suggestions for the best way to move forward on the emergency beach stabilization project for Montauk’s downtown.

“The ultimate goal is to have a stable beach that protects the vital commercial infrastructure in downtown Montauk and reverses the dramatic erosion effect that we saw as a result of Superstorm Sandy and other storms afterward,” he said.

The Army Corps is expected to begin work in early 2014, he added.

The Army Corps’ plans for Montauk started out as part of a broader Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, but they were fast-tracked after Superstorm Sandy.

Congress earlier this year approved $700 million in funding for the rebuilding of beaches and other protections for communities along the entire south shore of Long Island. About $500 million of that will be spent for people elevating homes on and around Fire Island, said Mr. Longwell. Mr. Bishop, along with Mr. Wilkinson, pushed for accelerating the project in Montauk. The Montauk portion of the beach nourishment project was flagged as a priority after the wallop the hamlet’s downtown took from Sandy.

The cost of the Montauk portion will depend on the precise work to be done—how much sand is needed and what kind of structures will be recommended to engineer the beach. Mr. Wilkinson said the work would be 100 percent covered by federal funds.

The Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, which Mr. Longwell said has been in development for 40 years, is a plan to better protect the south shore of Long Island from the effects of storms. When the project was initially presented in 2011, it mentioned a possible small-scale sand replenishment project in Montauk, but that work had been a low priority for the federal engineers working on the project.

Post-Sandy, Mr. Bishop and Mr. Wilkinson put pressure on the Army Corps and other federal officials to revisit the issue and placed additional emphasis on the importance of rebuilding the beaches that separate the ocean from the hamlet’s business district.

Just prior to the Fourth of July this year, the town conducted a smaller-scale beach nourishment effort to address some of the lingering effects of Sandy, Mr. Wilkinson said. That project involved trucking in and spreading more than 10,000 tons of sand at Ditch Plains, the popular swimming and surfing spot.

The special meeting is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. in Town Hall and will not include public participation. The board does not expect to take action then, according to Mr. Wilkinson.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is slated to present plans to the East Hampton Town Board on Thursday morning on how to rebuild the ocean beaches near downtown Montauk, a fully funded federal project that started out as part of a broader, Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, or FIMPS, but that has gotten fast-tracked post-Superstorm Sandy.

The special meeting is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. in Town Hall and will not include public participation. The board does not expect to take action then, according to Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson.

Congress approved earlier this year $700 million in funding for the rebuilding of beaches and other protections for communities along the entire south shore of Long Island, but the Montauk portion of that beach nourishment project has been flagged as a priority after the wallop the hamlet’s downtown took from Sandy. About $500 million of that will be spent for people raising homes on and around Fire Island, said Oliver Longwell, a communications director for U.S. Representative Tim Bishop, a Democrat from Southampton who, along with Mr. Wilkinson, a hamlet resident, pushed for the acceleration of the Montauk project.

The cost of the Montauk portion will depend on the precise work to be done—how much sand is needed and what kind of structures will be recommended to engineer the beach, for example, he said, but it, too, will be 100-percent covered by federal funds.

The Army Corps on Thursday is expected to lay out a variety of suggestions for the best way to move forward on the emergency beach stabilization project for Montauk’s downtown, Mr. Longwell said.

“The ultimate goal is to have a stable beach that protects the vital commercial infrastructure in downtown Montauk and reverses the dramatic erosion effect that we saw as a result of Superstorm Sandy and other storms afterward,” he said.

The Army Corps is shooting to begin work in early 2014, he added.

Mr. Wilkinson said that images he has received indicate that the proposed structures will not be a traditional bulkhead, but, rather, a buried seawall made of rock and covered by several yards of sand.

“So it’s not even perceptible,” he said,” sort of like an underlying foundation.”

FIMPS, which Mr. Longwell said has been in development for 40 years, is a plan to to better protect the south shore of Long Island from the effects of storms.

When the project was initially presented in 2011, it contained a mention of a possible small-scale sand replenishment project in Montauk, but that work had been a low priority for the federal engineers working on the project.

Post-Sandy, Mr. Bishop and Mr. Wilkinson put pressure on the Army Corps and other federal officials to revisit the issue and placed additional emphasis on the importance of rebuilding the beaches that separate the ocean from the hamlet’s business district.

Just prior to the Fourth of July this year, the town conducted a smaller-scale beach nourishment effort to address some of the lingering effects from Sandy, Mr. Wilkinson said. That project involved trucking in and spreading more than 10,000 tons of sand at Ditch Plains, the popular swimming and surfing spot.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could use structures—including one long oceanfront seawall and a series of groins—to rebuild the ocean beaches near downtown Montauk in order to strengthen the shoreline’s resistance to storm flooding.

The Army Corps is slated to present various plans to the East Hampton Town Board on Thursday morning. The proposals are expected to show how the proposed hard structures can be used to shore up the stretch of sand between the Atlantic and the commercial business district, which has been battered by storms and made especially vulnerable to erosion and flooding.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson said that images he has received indicate that one structure would not be a traditional bulkhead, but, rather, a buried seawall made of rock and covered by several yards of sand.

“So it’s not even perceptible,” he said. “Sort of like an underlying foundation.”

Oliver Longwell, communications director for U.S. Representative Tim Bishop, said the Army Corps is expected to lay out a variety of suggestions for the best way to move forward on the emergency beach stabilization project for Montauk’s downtown.

“The ultimate goal is to have a stable beach that protects the vital commercial infrastructure in downtown Montauk and reverses the dramatic erosion effect that we saw as a result of Superstorm Sandy and other storms afterward,” he said.

The Army Corps is expected to begin work in early 2014, he added.

The Army Corps’ plans for Montauk started out as part of a broader Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, but they were fast-tracked after Superstorm Sandy.

Congress earlier this year approved $700 million in funding for the rebuilding of beaches and other protections for communities along the entire south shore of Long Island. About $500 million of that will be spent for people elevating homes on and around Fire Island, said Mr. Longwell. Mr. Bishop, along with Mr. Wilkinson, pushed for accelerating the project in Montauk. The Montauk portion of the beach nourishment project was flagged as a priority after the wallop the hamlet’s downtown took from Sandy.

The cost of the Montauk portion will depend on the precise work to be done—how much sand is needed and what kind of structures will be recommended to engineer the beach. Mr. Wilkinson said the work would be 100 percent covered by federal funds.

The Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Study, which Mr. Longwell said has been in development for 40 years, is a plan to better protect the south shore of Long Island from the effects of storms. When the project was initially presented in 2011, it mentioned a possible small-scale sand replenishment project in Montauk, but that work had been a low priority for the federal engineers working on the project.

Post-Sandy, Mr. Bishop and Mr. Wilkinson put pressure on the Army Corps and other federal officials to revisit the issue and placed additional emphasis on the importance of rebuilding the beaches that separate the ocean from the hamlet’s business district.

Just prior to the Fourth of July this year, the town conducted a smaller-scale beach nourishment effort to address some of the lingering effects of Sandy, Mr. Wilkinson said. That project involved trucking in and spreading more than 10,000 tons of sand at Ditch Plains, the popular swimming and surfing spot.

The special meeting is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. in Town Hall and will not include public participation. The board does not expect to take action then, according to Mr. Wilkinson.

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