Sag Harbor Votes On Two School Bond Proposals

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The fate of two bond proposals for school improvements, totaling about $9 million, was slated to be decided by voters in the Sag Harbor School District in polling on Wednesday, November 13, that would continue after this week’s deadline. The results will be posted online at 27east.com.

The first bond proposal is for $7,357,132. It would be used to make health and safety, energy conservation, building code and handicapped-accessibility improvements, as well as to renovate the buildings and parking lots at the Sag Harbor Elementary School and Pierson. Plumbing, electrical and climate control systems would also be upgraded. The first proposition also includes extensive upgrades to the Pierson Middle-High School auditorium, the Pierson shop and technology classroom area, and Pierson’s kitchen, as well as creating additional storage to alleviate clutter in the Sag Harbor Elementary School gymnasium.

For Sag Harbor School District residents living in the Town of Southampton, the first bond would raise taxes $10 a year per $100,000 of assessed home value. For district residents living in the Town of East Hampton, taxes would go up $10.31 per $100,000.

The second proposition, seeking funds to replace the existing Pierson athletic field with synthetic turf and to add a two-lane walking track around the field, is for $1.62 million. For Town of Southampton residents in the district, the turf bond would raise taxes $2 a year per $100,000 of assessed value. For school district residents living in the Town of East Hampton, taxes would go up $2.26 a year per $100,000.

If both bonds are approved, the increases would be $12 a year and about $12.58 a year for Southampton and East Hampton residents, respectively, per $100,000 of assessed home value. A tax bill on a $1 million home would go up $120 a year in Southampton and $125.80 a year in East Hampton if both are approved.

Budgeted into the proposals are reserves for any unforeseen costs such as asbestos testing, PCB testing, survey work, safety condition studies and other costs that often make capital projects go over-budget. Any money that is not used for the projects will be put toward paying back the bond.

If the proposition passes, work could begin in the fall of 2014 and would be completed by the fall of 2016.

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